Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) at the People's Climate March: "We Have to Stop CO2 From Hurtling Into the Atmosphere"

Posted by Brad Johnson Wed, 24 Sep 2014 22:15:00 GMT

Taking part in the largest climate march in history, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said that Wall Street bankers will only act on climate change if people organize to make them do so. He also expressed succinctly the climate-policy challenge: “We have to stop CO2 from hurtling into the atmosphere.”

During the PeoplesClimate.tv livestream of the People’s Climate March, Hill Heat’s Brad Johnson caught up with Schumer as he chatted with billionaire climate activist Tom Steyer. The senator said that action from pension funds is needed to get Wall Street to stop financing fossil fuels, because the bankers will not lead.

“The leadership has to come from the people,” Schumer told me. “Pension funds could do a lot.”

Wall Street plays a tremendous role making New York one of the richest cities in the world. It drives the global economy, which is powered on fossil fuels. Even as Mayor DeBlasio is working to decarbonize the city’s energy supply, carbon financier David Koch is the richest man in the city. Meaningful global action on climate change, the type Schumer called for, will require Wall Street to fully divest from financing the fossil-fuel industry. Although pension-fund and other private action is helpful, what is truly needed is legislative action from Congress.

PeoplesClimate.tv is a project of Act.tv, the web video activism site.

Transcript:

SCHUMER: We need to stop CO2 from hurtling into the atmosphere. We need do it, we need to work for climate change both globally and locally. Globally, the whole UN is here. Globally, all the leaders of the the world should get together and maybe begin raising consciousness and doing so. Locally, we have to act on our own. We can’t wait for the leaders of the world. Today Mayor DeBlasio did a very good thing by saying he’s going to greatly increase the efficiency of buildings. That’s important.

Q: A lot of people are saying that leaders need to be the first ones to step up. What are you planning to do?

SCHUMER: I’ve been a leader of these things in Congress for a long time. But anybody in New York who doubted the effects of climate change changed their minds after Sandy.

. . .

BRAD JOHNSON: This is the richest city, perhaps in the world. Wall Street plays a tremendous role. It drives the global economy. Right now the global economy is powered on fossil fuels. How can finance, how can Wall Street change the tide?

SCHUMER: Well, one of the ways there’s leverage on Wall Street are pension funds, from the states, from the unions, and others. And if they say some things, sometimes Wall Street listens.

JOHNSON: Do you think there’s going to be leadership from the world of the banks, the bankers?

SCHUMER: No. The leadership has to come from the people, but as I said, pension funds could do a lot. He [Tom Steyer] knows a lot more about this than me.

Turning The Tide: Carbon Divestment for a Post-Sandy Wall Street

Posted by Brad Johnson Mon, 28 Oct 2013 00:00:00 GMT

In the New York City region, Sandy helped to mobilize a very necessary, overdue conversation on climate survival, but the politics and economics of ending climate pollution — specifically divesting from the fossil fuel industries — has still largely been ignored.

The forum, webcast live, will confront the challenge that Wall Street faces in its financing of the pollution that is threatening New York City’s future. We will also tackle this thorny question: Why is David H. Koch, NYC’s richest man, one of the people most responsible for blocking US climate action?

- Moderator: Brad Johnson, Forecast the Facts - James Slezak, founder of the New Economy Lab - Kate Gordon, VP and Director, Energy and Climate, Next Generation - Bracken Hendricks, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress - Sophie Lasoff, founder of NYU Divest

This forum follows the afternoon’s Turn the Tide on Sandy! rally at City Hall, organized by the Alliance for a Just Rebuilding.

8 PM at Cooper Union’s Rose Auditorium in New York City. RSVP here.

Happy Hour: Making Finance Sustainable 1

Posted by Brad Johnson Mon, 30 Mar 2009 22:30:00 GMT

Please come to the inaugural Hill Heat Happy Hour at the Reef in Adams Morgan, to drink Manhattans and discuss Copenhagen, and mix beers with biochar. Our special guest speaker will be Jerome Guillet, a top wind energy financier and sustainable energy blogger. In a brief presentation, Making Finance Sustainable, Jerome will discuss how to avoid another global financial meltdown and what barriers exist to the financing of the renewable energy sector.

RSVP

Jerome Guillet is a French investment banker based in Paris, specializing in the energy sector, and more specifically on wind power. He blogs as “Jerome a Paris” on DailyKos and other sites and is editor of the European Tribune (www.eurotrib.com), a website and European politics and international affairs, and contributing editor to The Oil Drum (www.theoildrum.com), a website focused on energy. He’s also a member of the “Energize America” Netroots effort to draft a sane energy policy.

The Reef
2446 18th St NW
Washington, DC 20009

RSVP now

Come to the Inaugural Hill Heat Happy Hour with Jerome Guillet 4

Posted by Brad Johnson Sun, 29 Mar 2009 12:56:00 GMT

Please come to the inaugural Hill Heat Happy Hour at the Reef in Adams Morgan Monday afternoon at 6:30, to drink Manhattans and discuss Copenhagen, and mix beers with biochar. Our special guest speaker will be Jerome Guillet, a top wind energy financier and sustainable energy blogger. In a brief presentation, Making Finance Sustainable, Jerome will discuss how to avoid another global financial meltdown and what barriers exist to the financing of the renewable energy sector. Raise your spirits while you raise your glass, and share ideas while you share a pitcher.

Jerome Guillet is a French investment banker based in Paris, specializing in the energy sector, and more specifically on wind power. He blogs as “Jerome a Paris” on DailyKos and other sites and is editor of the European Tribune (www.eurotrib.com), a website and European politics and international affairs, and contributing editor to The Oil Drum (www.theoildrum.com), a website focused on energy. He’s also a member of the “Energize America” Netroots effort to draft a sane energy policy.

RSVP here.

Carbon Market Insights Americas 2008 4

Posted by Brad Johnson Fri, 14 Nov 2008 13:00:00 GMT

Carbon Market Insights Americas 2008 Day 3

8:00am Registration Open

9:00am – 12:00pm Modeling & Forecasting Carbon Prices (Advanced)

This workshop will present various approaches used to forecast carbon prices, in Europe and North America.
  • Advantages and disadvantages of macro- and micro-economic models
  • The role of time in forecasting carbon prices
  • Integrating sectors in multi-sector models
  • Modeling the supply of offsets

9:00am – 12:00pm Valuation of CDM Projects & Portfolios (Intermediate)

The Price is Right: Assessing Risk and Value in the Clean Development Mechanism
  • Understanding political and country risks
  • Price and volume risk in CDM offset contracts
  • Valuation of carbon assets – state of the art tools and methodologies

Description

Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects present many opportunities for investors and project developers who understand the risks and opportunities embedded in the project cycle. Point Carbon presents its unique expertise on CDM projects around the world and its award-winning Carbon Valuation Tool, a web-based tool for valuation and benchmarking of CDM and JI projects and portfolios.

9:00am – 12:00pm Carbon Finance 2.0 (Advanced)

Trading in options on European Union *Allowances: liquidity, prices and pitfalls
  • Structured offset products: how to tailor offset products to customer’s risk appetite?
  • Bidding strategies in carbon auctions

Description

Back by popular demand, Carbon Finance 2.0 will be presented by Point Carbon jointly with key carbon market experts. The workshop will provide cutting edge analysis on the latest financial structures developed to manage the risks in these markets.

9:00am – 12:00pm The New Offset Landscape: North American Demand, Agriculture & Forestry (Introductory)

Greenhouse gas reduction projects in North America
  • Offsets from agriculture and forestry
  • The role of offsets under a future cap-and-trade program

Description

This workshop will get into the details of greenhouse gas emissions reduction projects in North America. We will discuss emerging trends in offset types and protocols, especially in forestry and agriculture. Participants will learn what types of emission credits are generated, as well as how they are verified and marketed. We will hear from some of the key players in the North American offset market on preparing for the role of offsets under a future cap-and-trade system.

Marriott Wardman Park Hotel

Carbon Market Insights Americas 2008 1

Posted by Brad Johnson Wed, 12 Nov 2008 12:00:00 GMT

Carbon Market Insights Americas 2008

7:00am Registration & Exhibit Hall Open

8:00am Optional Session – Carbon Markets 101
  • Optional and free introduction to the carbon markets for all conference delegates.
10:00am Welcome
  • Per-Otto Wold CEO, Point Carbon
  • Eileen Claussen President, Pew Center on Global Climate Change
10:15am Keynote Address – The Path Forward
  • Janos Pasztor, Director, Environment Management Group, United Nations
  • President-elect’s Environmental Advisor
Topics:
  • Statement of behalf of the Secretary-General
  • The new administration’s climate plan
  • The impact on ongoing negotiations for a new international agreement
  • Timeline and targets for climate policy developments

Description: What will the new administration do about climate change? Will a cap-and-trade bill be passed in the first 100 days of the new presidency? Will the US agree to a new international climate treaty? We’ll hear the latest on this from a key advisor to the president-elect and from a top UN official, who will discuss how the US elections change the landscape of international negotiations on climate change and where the world will head after 2012, when the first compliance period of the Kyoto Protocol ends.

11:00am Plenary – US Climate Policy: What’s Ahead?
  • Moderator: Eileen Claussen, President, Pew Center on Global Climate Change
Topics:
  • Steps taken and lessons learned on climate change policy in the 110th Congress
  • Expectations for a new Congress and Administration on enacting climate policy in 2009
  • Major challenges, including cost-containment and allowance value distribution to enacting cap-and-trade in the US, especially in light of the current financial crisis
Speakers:
  • Senator Jeff Bingaman (D-NM), Chairman of the Energy and Natural Resources Committee
  • Larry J. Schweiger, President & CEO, National Wildlife Federation
  • Brian Storms, CEO, APX

Description: With a new Administration and a new Congress, what can we expect to see with regard to US climate policy in 2009? What concrete steps, if any, have the Bush Administration and the 110th Congress taken to advance climate policy and what can we learn from this? If cap and trade is the preferred policy approach, what are the major roadblocks (e.g., target-setting, distribution of allowance value) on the path to successfully enacting the policy? Panelists will discuss these and other important questions policymakers will have to address if the US is to successfully address the issue of climate change.

12.00pm Lunch

1:30pm Managing Costs in a Carbon Market
  • Moderator: Janet Peace, Vice President, Markets and Business Strategy, Pew Center on Global Climate Change
  • Concerns about carbon markets leading to unmanageable costs for participants and the economy
  • Discussion of proposed options for containing high costs: offsets, safety-valve, allowance allocation, oversight board, etc.
  • How would these options affect the efficiency and performance of the market?
Panel Speakers:
  • Mort Webster, Visiting Professor, MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change
  • Jason Patrick, Vice President, Merrill Lynch
  • Steve Corneli, Vice President, Market and Climate Policy, NRG Energy
  • Ben Feldman, Executive Director, Environmental Markets Strategy, JP Morgan
1:30pm Evolving Regional & Global Markets
  • Moderator: Denny Ellerman, Executive Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research, Sloan School of Management, MIT
  • Panel of experts will discuss emissions trading systems around the world
  • Comparing carbon market approaches
  • Exploring possible linkages
Panel Speakers:
  • Margret Kim, Senior Advisor, International Climate Change and China Program Director, California Air Resources Board
  • Jill Duggan, Head of International Emissions Trading, United Kingdom
  • Peter Zapfel, Directorate General for Environment, European Commission
  • Tim Denne, Director, Covec Limited & New Zealand ICAP Representative
3:30pm Carbon Risk Management
  • Moderator: Veronique Bugnion, Managing Director, Point Carbon
  • The role played by financial institutions in managing carbon risks
  • RGGI auctions: who participated and who stayed on the sidelines?
  • Canadian carbon intensity based financial instruments: how does it work?
Panel Speakers:
  • Annmarie Reynolds, Director, Carbon Exchange, AES
  • Patrick Birley, CEO, ECX
  • Olivia Hartridge, Vice President, Morgan Stanley Commodities
  • Jean-Philippe Brisson, Vice President, Goldman Sachs

3:30pm The Changing Roles of States

  • Moderator: Judi Greenwald, Vice President, Innovative Solutions, Pew Center on Global Climate Change
  • What are the appropriate respective roles for state and federal government in climate policy?
  • Are some complementary policies more effectively implemented at the state level?
  • How can federal policy best support and complement these state efforts?
Panel Speakers:
  • Michael Murray, Regional Vice President, Sempra Energy
  • Janice Adair, Chair, Western Climate Initiative
  • Michael Sole, Secretary, Florida Department of Environmental Protection
  • Ray Hammarlund, Director, Energy Programs Division, Kansas Corporation Commission
  • Peter Iwanowicz, Director, Climate Change Office, New York State DEC

Marriott Wardman Park Hotel, Washington D.C.

Day of Action Against Coal Finance 1

Posted by Brad Johnson Fri, 16 Nov 2007 05:00:00 GMT

Join Rainforest Action Network, Coal River Mountain Watch, Appalachian Voices , Rising Tide, Mountain Justice Summer, SEAC and a cast of thousands as we mobilize to stop Bank of America and Citi’s investments in the dirty coal industry for the Day of Action Against Coal Finance.

On November 16th and 17th we are asking anyone and everyone concerned with stopping the US coal rush to join us in taking the message to Wall Street. From flyering and leafletting at your local bank branch or ATM, to creative street theater or non-violent direct action at bank offices – help our climate and communities by demanding clean energy.

Get training and support. We have several conference calls for our network before the event. If you need training, ideas, support, or want to find others in your area – contact us at dirtymoney@ran.org

Download flyers, signs, banners and more. Check out our Action Resources Page.

It’s time to take to the streets and send Bank of America and Citi a strong message that grassroots movements against coal extraction, processing and combustion demand an end to coal financing.

RSVP.

Finance Companies Gear Up for Coal Finance Direct Action 9

Posted by Brad Johnson Thu, 15 Nov 2007 21:58:00 GMT

This memo is being circulated among target companies:
Rainforest Action Network (RAN) is organizing what it calls a National Day of Action Against Coal Finance on Nov. 16 and 17. They have distributed flyers and are planning a rally at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17, at Kiener Plaza. Another rally is being planned at Washington University on Friday, Nov. 16.

They are targeting Peabody as well as Bank of America and Citigroup, Inc. At a recent rally in Charlotte, N.C., four protesters were arrested for trespassing while hanging a giant banner from a crane at a nearby construction project.

Please exercise caution when entering and leaving the office on Friday and Saturday.

Ed.—links added.